May 11, 2017

COM/COPH Students Awarded Bourne Scholarships

Bourne Scholarship students with Paula Anderson M D

Bourne Scholarship students with Paula Anderson, MD

Two UAMS College of Medicine (COM)/College of Public Health (COPH) students were awarded the David Bourne Public Health Physician Memorial Scholarship in February. Brian Kennedy and Collins Scott were presented their $1,000 scholarships on Feb. 7 at the UAMS COPH.

The David Bourne Public Health Physician Memorial Scholarship is awarded to a medical student or resident who exhibits an interest and aptitude in public health policy through study in obtaining an MPH at the COPH. David Bourne, M.D., was a public health advocacy leader in Arkansas who worked successfully to ensure that all tobacco settlement funds awarded to the state went toward health promotion and disease prevention programs.

Kennedy is a fourth year COM student and will finish his MPH later this year. “I was fortunate enough to live in Southern Africa for two summers. I helped build a health clinic, taught English at a university, and played soccer with children living in government apartments that are plagued by gang violence,” Kennedy said. “While there I recognized a desperate need, relief from HIV/AIDS. The epidemic exists largely because women lack basic rights, are often prevented from receiving an education, and are subsequently forced into prostitution in order to provide for their children.” This experience helped Kennedy see the importance of public health.

“As a public health physician, I plan to empower and educate the women of Southern Africa by teaching in and continuing to build clinics. I’m especially interested in obstetrics and infectious disease transmission during childbirth,” said Kennedy.

Scott is a third year COM student with an interest in general surgery. “I am hoping to use the knowledge I acquire in the MPH program to identify areas for improvement in the field of surgery,” Scott said. “I am specifically interested in outcomes-based research and identifying barriers that patients face to access surgical care.”