UAMS.EDU

Charlotte A. Hobbs, MD, PhD

C O P H Professor Department of Epidemiology Charlotte A. Hobbs, M D, P h DProfessor (Secondary), Department of Epidemiology

 

Other Academic/Research/Policy Affiliations

Professor, Department Pediatrics/Birth Defects, UAMS and Arkansas Children’s Hospital

Director, Arkansas Center for Birth Defects Research and Prevention, UAMS, and Arkansas Children’s Hospital

Section Chief, Birth Defects Research, Department of Pediatrics, UAMS

Scientific Director, Arkansas Reproductive Health Monitoring System, Arkansas Children’s Hospital

Co-Director, Arkansas Center for Birth Defects Research and Prevention, UAMS

Active Staff Neonatology Level I and II, UAMS, Arkansas Children’s Hospital

 

Contact Information

Office: Arkansas Children’s Research Institute, Room 3083A
Phone: 501-364-500

Email: hobbscharlotte@uams.edu

Education

1992 – M. D., McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario
1991 – Ph.D in Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec
1979 – Bachelor’s of Education, Queens’ University, Kingston, Ontario
1978 – Bachelor’s of Arts with Distinction, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario

Research Interests

Study maternal exposures to medications and diseases like diabetes and obesity and   increased risk of having a baby with a birth defect.  My research interests involve genetic epidemiology of birth defects, including neural tube defects, congenital heart defects, and Down syndrome.

Current Research Projects

  • CDC Birth Defects Study to Evaluate Pregnancy exposureS (BD-STEPS) PI: Charlotte Hobbs
  • NICHD Genomic and Epigenomic Factors Associated with Non-Syndromic Congenital Heart Defect Risk – PI: Charlotte Hobbs
  • CDC Arkansas Center for Birth Defects Research and Prevention – PI: Charlotte Hobbs
  • Arkansas House Bill/State of Arkansas Appropriations Arkansas Reproductive Health Monitoring System (ARHMS) PI: Charlotte Hobbs
  • Arkansas Children’s Hospital Research Institute/ CUMG   The Role of LINE-1 in Congenital Heart Defects Neonatology Section; University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences- ongoing funding  Role: PI
  • Arkansas Children’s Hospital Research Institute – Endowment Role: Pamela D. Stephens Chair in Birth Defects Research

Recent Publications

  1. Glidewell J, Reefhuis J, Rasmussen SA. Woomert A. Hobbs CA, Romitti PA, Crider K National Birth Defects Prevention Study. Factors affecting maternal participation in the genetic component of the National Birth Defects Prevention – United States, 1997-2007   Genetics in Medicine. 2013 Sept 26
  2. Weedn AE, Mosley BA, Cleves MA, Waller DK, Canfield MA, Correa A, Hobbs CA; National Birth Defects Prevention Study.  Maternal reporting of prenatal ultrasounds among women in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study. Birth Defects Research Part A: Clinical and Molecular Teratology. Epub 2013 Oct 5. doi: 10.1002/bdra.23178. PMID: 24123727.
  3. Sotres-Alvarez D, Siega-Riz AM, Herring AH, Carmichael SL, Feldkamp ML, Hobbs CA, Olshan AF; National Birth Defects Prevention Study.  Maternal Dietary Patterns are Associated with Risk of Neural Tube and Congenital Heart Defects.  American Journal of Epidemiology. 2013 Jun 1: 177(11): 1279-1288. Epub 2013 May 2. doi: 10.1093/aje/kws349. PMID: 23639938. PMCID: PMC3664332.
  4. Hunter JE, Allen EG, Shin M, Bean LJ, Correa A, Druschel C, Hobbs CA, O’Leary LA, Romitti PA, Royle MH, Torfs CP, Freeman SB, Sherman SL. The association of low socioeconomic status and the risk of having a child with Down syndrome: a report from the National Down Syndrome Project. Genetics in Medicine. Epub 2013 April 4. doi: 10.1038/gim.2013.34. PMID: 23558253.
  5. Blossom SJ, Rau JL, Best TH, Bornemeier RA, Hobbs CA.  Increased maternal cytokine production and congenital heart defects.  Journal of Reproductive Immunology.  2013 Apr: 97(2): 204-210. Epub 2013 Feb 18. doi: 10.1016/j.jri.2012.12.004. PMID: 23428339.